Arizona

Lighting the Path

Lighting the Path

 

Here’s another favorite from last week’s exploration of Sabino Creek with the water flowing, mist rising in the chill morning air, and rays of light beaming through the naked branches of the sycamores. I have so many winter portraits of bare-branched trees that I call them my ‘Dead Tree Collection’. There is a rhythm and poetry to the silhouette of bare branches against the sky, uplifted and graceful almost like dancers.

I did pay the price however. I have succumbed to some version of winter crud so, as I cough, blow my nose, and guzzle medicine, I’m keeping this post mercifully brief.

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Sony a7RII, 1/800 sec at f/8.0, ISO 100, 70mm (24.0-70.0mm lens)

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the US Copyright Office. Enjoy but please respect.

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Landscapes, Sunrise/Sunset, USA, 0 comments
Sabino Creek Sunrise

Sabino Creek Sunrise

 

A new year, and back to my photography after a hiatus during the holidays. We’ve been having some lovely rainstorms with snow falling in the mountains. The result is that Sabino Creek, usually dry, is running again. We’ve lost our shortcut across the river, but the enhanced scenery is worth it.

This morning I woke before dawn and saw that a low fog was blanketing the creek. I knew the combination of the coming sunrise and the lifting mist would offer a rare photographic opportunity. I spent a couple of hours at the water’s edge, and even midstream (soaking my shoes) in pursuit of some landscape photographs to add to my portfolio. There were several keepers in the lot, but this one might be the favorite.

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Sony a7RII, 1/500 sec at f/8.0, ISO 100, 25mm (24.0-70.0mm lens)

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the US Copyright Office. Enjoy but please respect.

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Landscapes, Sunrise/Sunset, USA, 2 comments
Winter Cottonwood

Winter Cottonwood

 

 

‘Tis the season for fall color photography! Of course here in Tucson fall color can be hard to come by. Plus the temperature hit 97 degrees just the other day – so it’s a challenge to get into the mood! But today is Halloween, tomorrow is the first day of November, and Christmas is right around the corner. So autumn it is and here’s an image to celebrate the season.

Cottonwoods are my favorite trees. We live along the banks of Sabino Creek, one of Tucson’s last living waterways, and so we are privileged to enjoy the ambiance of a riparian environment and we really do see a bit of fall color from the cottonwoods and the ash trees as they turn bright yellow before losing their leaves at first frost. But cottonwoods cling to their leaves for as long as absolutely possible, even if every other tree in the vicinity is stark naked. Usually the last cottonwood leaf falls in mid-December. The downside is that the raking season is extended by several weeks – and cottonwoods are massive trees with a LOT of leaves.

But by mid-February new leaves are already budding out in anticipation of spring, at least a month ahead of any other tree around. Personally I hate the chill of winter, even here in the desert southwest where snowbirds flock to avoid the real winter in the North and East. Those early budding cottonwoods lift up my depressed winter spirits with their optimistic forecast of spring.

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Nikon D700, 1/250 sec at f/6.7, ISO 400, 340mm

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the US Copyright Office. Enjoy but please respect.

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Landscapes, Scenic, USA, 0 comments
Desert Kaleidoscope

Desert Kaleidoscope

Early this past spring I headed outdoors to photograph a white egret that had been hanging around our property. The egret never cooperated, staying far out of range of my camera lens, but a roadrunner on the hunt showed up instead. I captured several satisfying images of him as he darted by in pursuit of a lizard or whatever a roadrunner eats! I especially enjoy this capture for the kaleidoscope-like effect of the background created by the lens bokeh, while the roadrunner emerges into focus with even his tiniest feathers rim lit by the sunlight.

Nikon D810, 1/1600 sec at f/5.6, ISO 1100, 500mm (200.0-500.0 mm f/5.6), hand held

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the US Copyright Office. Enjoy, but please respect.

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Birds, USA, Wildlife, 0 comments
Bridle Portrait of Nouska

Bridle Portrait of Nouska

 

Nouska is a Dutch Warmblood mare imported from Great Britain to compete at showjumping’s Grand Prix level. I captured this shot while she was waiting at ringside to compete, and processed it using a high key effect to blow out the background. I like the limited color palette and the great detail that reveals even the stitching on her bridle. Nouska went on to win the Grand Prix that day. She is now retired to broodmare status.

Nikon D700, 1/750 sec at f/4.8, ISO 400, 125mm, hand held

Unfortunately, my online Store|Gallery crashed late last week and the weekend has interfered with a quick fix from tech support. Hopefully all will be back to normal in a few days. You can check in at cbparkerphoto.com – but if you see blank white where the images should be, have patience (mine is wearing thin!).

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the US Copyright Office. Enjoy, but please respect.

Posted by Carol in Animals, Arizona, Equestrian, Horses, USA, 0 comments
White Water Lily

White Water Lily

 

There’s not much to say about White Water Lily, other than that we have a pond in our backyard filled to the brim with water lilies. In winter they are a sad, limp, discolored array. But in summer the leaves spread and curl up to the sky and the vibrant white and yellow blossoms open to the sun by day, closing tightly again into buds for the night. Resident frogs fill the evenings with discordant croaking, and from their sunbathing vantage points quickly plop into the water to shelter beneath the blanket of lily pads when startled.

I spent a couple of hours early one morning photographing the blooms from every conceivable angle. On review, this image rose to the forefront for the simplicity of the composition, the strong, bold shapes created by light and shadow, and the translucence of the backlit petals.

White Water Lily was introduced to the public in New York City in an exhibit mounted by Agora Gallery, a contemporary art gallery in New York’s Chelsea art district. Prints are available for purchase HERE.

Nikon D4, 1/350 sec at f/5.6, ISO 100, 260 mm (200.0-400.00 mm f/4.0 lens). Handheld.

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Please respect.

 

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Flowers, Scenic, USA, 0 comments
White Water Lily

White Water Lily

 

There’s not much to say about White Water Lily, other than that we have a pond in our backyard filled to the brim with water lilies. In winter they are a sad, limp, discolored array. But in summer the leaves spread and curl up to the sky and the vibrant white and yellow blossoms open to the sun by day, closing tightly again into buds for the night. Resident frogs fill the evenings with discordant croaking, and from their sunbathing vantage points quickly plop into the water to shelter beneath the blanket of lily pads when startled.

I spent a couple of hours early one morning photographing the blooms from every conceivable angle. On review, this image rose to the forefront for the simplicity of the composition, the strong, bold shapes created by light and shadow, and the translucence of the backlit petals.

White Water Lily was introduced to the public in New York City in an exhibit mounted by Agora Gallery, a contemporary art gallery in New York’s Chelsea art district. Prints are available for purchase HERE.

Nikon D4, 1/350 sec at f/5.6, ISO 100, 260 mm (200.0-400.00 mm f/4.0 lens). Handheld.

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Please respect.

 

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Flowers, Scenic, USA, 0 comments
Navajo Pony After A Dust Storm

Navajo Pony After A Dust Storm

 

True to the adage that one seldom explores one’s own backyard, I have lived in Arizona since 1958 and never once visited spectacular Monument Valley on the Arizona/Utah border. In 2012 that changed when I joined a photo workshop with like-minded photographers, and spent a week touring the highlights of this unique and beautiful area. On arrival we were hit with the frustrating realization that we were hard on the heels of massive dust storm that obliterated light and turned the sky yellow with blowing sand.

Not only did this compromise the scenery we hoped to photograph, it created a challenge for the camera gear which is easily damaged by the invasive grit. Changing lenses in the field was a recipe for disaster; the best solution was to carry two cameras each configured for different shooting scenarios.

A few days later the dust settled, the sky turned blue, and we discovered that the dunes had been swept clean into freshly rippled contours, a silver lining after all. Meanwhile I captured this image of a Navajo pony on the rez, haircoat embedded with red desert sand and eyes squinted against the blowing grit. I like his rough presence, bold shadow and the iconic landscape on the horizon.

Navajo Pony After A Dust Storm prints are available for purchase HERE

Nikon D3S, 1/750 sec at f/5.6, ISO 200, 44 mm (28.0-300.00 mm f/3.5-5.6 lens).

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Please respect.

 

 

Posted by Carol in Animals, Arizona, Horses, Landscapes, Scenic, USA, 0 comments
The Bobcat

The Bobcat

 

We have the good fortune to live alongside Sabino Creek on Tucson’s eastside, a riparian area which as a result remains a wildlife corridor in an urban area. Bobcats, coyotes, javelina, jack rabbits, hawks, quail, roadrunners and more abound.

I spend a lot of time at the computer editing and refining my digital photographs. Truth be told, this is as much fun for me as the actual photography. One autumn morning my housekeeper interrupted my concentration to announce that there was a ‘gato muy grande’ in the backyard. I grabbed my handheld camera with a walk-around zoom lens already attached and tiptoed into the backyard to check him out.

This handsome bobcat, in full winter coat, was only about 10 feet away from the house but conveniently near his escape route into the riverbed. He gave me an intense look over his shoulder, I clicked twice, and he was gone.

It took some careful editing to bring this image to life, but it has become one of my favorites.

The Bobcat is available for purchase HERE

Nikon D4 1/1600 sec at f/5/6, ISO 800, 400 mm (80.0-400.00 mm f/4.5-5.6 lens)

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Please respect.

 

 

 

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Bobcats, USA, Wildlife, 0 comments
Blood Moon and Clouds

Blood Moon and Clouds

 

 

The total lunar eclipse of September 27, 2015, was a lazy photographer’s dream. For starters, totality was visible from my own home town of Tucson. No need to drive or fly to a distant destination to observe – bonus point #1. Bonus point #2 – not only was this a total eclipse of the moon, but it was a Super Moon as well! And best of all, here in Tucson, the eclipse took place during prime time! Totality commenced at 7:11 p.m. local time and ended at 8:24 p.m. No need to set alarm clocks – instead I was able to set up my tripod, camera and lens during the sunset hours while I could still read the settings on my camera without a flashlight.

Husband Mike came along with a bottle of wine and two glasses and set himself up on the nearby patio furniture, and when the time was right I just clicked away. The wispy clouds added some individual character to my shot, which otherwise was a scene photographed by the thousands (tens of thousands?) around the world.

Nikon D4 .5 sec at f/4.0, ISO 200, 400mm (200.0-400.0 mm f/4..0), tripod. Composite of two photos.

BLOOD MOON AND CLOUDS available for purchase HERE

Photo is copyrighted and registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Please respect.

Posted by Carol in Arizona, Night Skies, Scenic, USA, 0 comments